Yakutat
web-posted Wednesday, June 24, 2015
Stories told about Native Alaskans' first contact with European Americans tend to be negative, said Yakutat Tlingit Tribe President Victoria Demmert. But not all of them are - and the Yakutat Tlingit Tribe, in collaboration with the Rasmuson Foundation, on June 29 will raise a totem pole both commemorating the Rasmuson family's relationship with Yakutat and celebrating the foundation's 60th anniversary.
web-posted Wednesday, June 24, 2015
Editor's note: This list was reviewed in June 2015. If you have changes or additions, email stephanie.west@morris.com.
web-posted Wednesday, June 3, 2015
web-posted Wednesday, June 3, 2015
Sealaska Heritage will sponsor 10 free formline design workshops in 10 communities in June, beginning with a June 4-5 workshop in Haines, led by Wayne Price. The workshops, offered through SHI's Jineit Art Academy, are designed to help artists at all levels to learn and enhance their formline, a term that describes the complex designs that are the underlying components of Northwest Coast art. Another goal is to increase the number of Native artists and art instructors qualified to teach Northwest Coast art in public schools.
web-posted Wednesday, May 27, 2015
YAKUTAT - Many of Yakutat's problems are connected, but many of them have to do with a lack of connection.
web-posted Wednesday, May 27, 2015
YAKUTAT - In the past five years, Yakutat has lost a quarter of its 800 residents, its economy has shrunk, and its school funding has been drastically cut. But a group of organizations and concerned community members have been working to revitalize it with wide-ranging efforts. They're trying to bring better internet to town; they're volunteering their services to repair literal holes in school buildings; they're starting museums, recruiting cruise ships, cutting brush, pursuing grants, encouraging entrepreneurship, looking at ways to lessen utility bills, and holding town meetings.
web-posted Wednesday, May 27, 2015
Yakutat has one of the largest and southernmost known breeding colonies of Aleutian Terns, a fact that is particularly important given the suspected decline of this avian population worldwide. The Yakutat Tern Festival, first held in 2011, highlights this community's role as a front-runner in the field of Aleutian Tern research, including studies on population trends, nesting ecology, and migration patterns -- about which little is known. The festival, which also highlights Yakutat's cultural resources, includes birding activities, natural history field trips, art exhibits, educational events for kids and adults, a photo contest, Native cultural presentations and more.
web-posted Wednesday, May 20, 2015
Juneau Wednesday
web-posted Wednesday, May 20, 2015
To the many speakers and attendees at its May 15 opening ceremonies, the Walter Soboleff Building is a work of art, a home for culture, and a powerful symbol of Tlingit, Haida, and Tsimshian people's perseverance and strength. It's also a fitting tribute to Dr. Walter Soboleff, an ordained Presbyterian minister who passed away in 2011 at the age of 102, inspired many in Southeast Alaska with his Sunday morning radio broadcasts, and worked to cultivate Alaska Native pride at a time it was much needed.
web-posted Wednesday, May 13, 2015
YAKUTAT - Some humans may think of Yakutat as out-of-the-way, but it's right where one of the world's largest known breeding colonies of Aleutian terns wants to be. So for the fifth year, organizers of the Yakutat Tern Festival are hoping people will join terns in making Yakutat a destination. "The idea was around for many years to do some sort of wildlife birding festival," said Yakutat-based wildlife biologist Susan Oehlers. "There's definitely interest in the community for having folks come in to do more than just fish, but there's not that awareness.... We're looking at it from the ecotourism standpoint, and to support the local economy, which is suffering."
web-posted Wednesday, May 13, 2015
Juneau
web-posted Wednesday, May 6, 2015
Ravens cawed. Gulls mewed. People hammered.
web-posted Wednesday, May 6, 2015
For the hundred or so years cruise ships have been visiting Southeast Alaska, the residents of Yakutat haven't been so sure about them. But this summer, prompted by a declining population and economy, the town will come out in force to welcome two shiploads of tourists.
web-posted Wednesday, May 6, 2015
Tlingit artist Jeremiah James always knew he wasn't meant for the 9-5 working life. What he didn't know is that hunting could be a part of how he makes his living.
web-posted Wednesday, May 6, 2015
Juneau
web-posted Wednesday, April 29, 2015
Yakutat - After he graduated from Mount Edgecumbe High School in Sitka, Bertrand J. Adams Sr., who writes under his Tlingit name, Kadashan, didn't want to go to college.
web-posted Wednesday, April 29, 2015
Juneau Wednesday
web-posted Wednesday, April 29, 2015
In an old Army Air Force hangar in Yakutat, Bob Miller has boxes of World War II-era letters from soldiers to loved ones. He has more than 400 posters exhorting the reader to "do your part," or fight for "freedom from fear," or remember December 7. He has Disney drawings from the war.
web-posted Wednesday, April 22, 2015
A mile long string of 29 sablefish pots was lost last month in Prince William Sound after being run over by tugs towing barges at Knight Island Passage.
web-posted Wednesday, April 22, 2015
Juneau Wednesday
web-posted Wednesday, April 15, 2015
Juneau Wednesday
web-posted Wednesday, April 15, 2015
JUNEAU - When the U.S. Forest Service's revised map of the Juneau Icefield is printed next month, it will contain an original Tlingit place name for the first time: Tlaxhsatanjín, which can be translated as "idle hands" or "hands at rest."
web-posted Wednesday, April 8, 2015
You'd be hard-pressed to find a Southeast Alaskan that doesn't love salmon, or a salmon that doesn't need clean water.
web-posted Wednesday, April 8, 2015
JUNEAU
web-posted Wednesday, March 25, 2015
Seven times is the charm for building some momentum on a measure that aims to give personal use (PU) fisheries a priority over commercial and sport users. As it stands now, the three fisheries all are on equal footing in the eyes and actions of state managers.
web-posted Wednesday, March 25, 2015
Juneau
web-posted Wednesday, March 25, 2015
Festival season is upon us in Southeast Alaska. This weekend, Skagwegians will welcome hundreds to their community for the Buckwheat Ski Classic, marking winter's end with a distinctive celebration of snow. Next weekend, Ketchikan will celebrate a harbinger of spring - the Rufous hummingbird - with the start of its month-long Alaska Hummingbird Festival. And the week after that, beginning April 6, it's the Alaska Folk Festival in Juneau - the official kick-off to warmer weather for many. From there, a different festival will be taking place somewhere in Southeast nearly every weekend through September. The CCW will be putting out its annual Fun & Festival Guide next month, but to help readers keep track of what's happening on a weekly basis, we've introduced a Southeast Spotlight box on page 2, highlighting a major event or festival in a Southeast community for the coming week. This spotlight will supplement our What's Happening listings on page 3.
web-posted Wednesday, March 18, 2015
Juneau Wednesday
web-posted Wednesday, March 11, 2015
Like wood carving and textile weaving, metalsmithing is an artform for which the Tlingit and Haida tribes of Southeast Alaska have long been well known. Beginning with the use of Alaskan copper prior to contact, and continuing with post-contact materials such as silver, Tlingit and Haida craftsman laid the foundation for a tradition that continues to flourish in the work of modern artists.
web-posted Wednesday, March 11, 2015
Editor's note: We are currently in the process of updating these listings. If you have information you would like to see appear here, please contact editor@capweek.com.
web-posted Wednesday, March 4, 2015
Editor's note: We are currently in the process of updating these listings. If you have information you would like to see appear here, please contact editor@capweek.com.


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