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For many people across the world, 2009 was not an easy year to be in business, which often made those who gave it a go all the more admirable. New businesses in town change the character of our communities, whether adding fine arts, body art, or culinary art. When a long-standing business shuts down, community members often feel the hole remaining. In towns as small as ours, business owners are familiar faces. Here are a just a few faces behind some of the businesses profiled in the CCW this year.
Faces of businesses, old and new, that make our towns unique 123009 NEWS 4 Capital City Weekly For many people across the world, 2009 was not an easy year to be in business, which often made those who gave it a go all the more admirable. New businesses in town change the character of our communities, whether adding fine arts, body art, or culinary art. When a long-standing business shuts down, community members often feel the hole remaining. In towns as small as ours, business owners are familiar faces. Here are a just a few faces behind some of the businesses profiled in the CCW this year.

Photo By Libby Sterling

Blowing Off Steam: Juneau Steamboat Co.: Pam Horton, Frankie Miller and Captain John George stand in front of one of two steamboats operated by the Juneau Steamboat Co., now in its fifth season. Rising fuel costs have been a thorn in the side of many vessel-based tour operators, but not the steamboat company, which runs on scrap wood and rainwater, making the tour one of Juneau's most eco-friendly.


Photo By Jessie Waddell

Sustainable Restaurant: Larkspur Café: Amelia Budd and Amy Kane opened the Larkspur Café in Sitka in March. The menu, which changes daily, uses as many local and regional ingredients as possible, including seafood purchases directly from local fishermen and produce from the Sitka Farmer's Market in the summer. "It's not just more economical," Kane said. "It's better food."


Photo By Libby Sterling

New Body Art Shop: High Tide Tattoo: Tattoo artists Dave Lang and Jack Marchant, and body piercer Shane Sewell are the artists at New Tide Tattoo, which opened in Juneau in March. "It's a service industry," Lang said. "It's not as much about my individual art as it is about making people happy, figuring out exactly what they want and taking it very seriously. I'm up a lot of nights drawing. Every tattoo is a big deal."


Photo By Libby Sterling

Fine Art for Fine Lives: Salty and Jim Hanes: Salty Hanes and her husband Jim (not shown) opened the Bentwood and Bead gallery at the end of 2008. In 2009, it become a regular fixture in Juneau's First Friday gallery walk. The Hanes live above their gallery and they enjoy working together and keeping things on a small scale. "We're back to how we started, which is small and doing it together," Jim said.

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Wednesday, December 30, 2009

Story last updated at 12/30/2009 - 12:13 pm

Faces of businesses, old and new, that make our towns unique

For many people across the world, 2009 was not an easy year to be in business, which often made those who gave it a go all the more admirable. New businesses in town change the character of our communities, whether adding fine arts, body art, or culinary art. When a long-standing business shuts down, community members often feel the hole remaining. In towns as small as ours, business owners are familiar faces. Here are a just a few faces behind some of the businesses profiled in the CCW this year.


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