Speakingout
It seems that in our instant, digital forward society that we have left a few important things in the dust - primarily, quality communication.
The lost art of communication 121212 SPEAKINGOUT 1 Capital City Weekly It seems that in our instant, digital forward society that we have left a few important things in the dust - primarily, quality communication.

Photo By Sarah Day / Capital City Weekly

Juneau Brownie Troop 4036 sings Christmas carols on Friday, Dec. 7 in Downtown Juneau for First Friday's Gallery Walk. The troop is raising money for a summer trip to Whitehorse.

Wednesday, December 12, 2012

Story last updated at 12/12/2012 - 3:22 pm

The lost art of communication

It seems that in our instant, digital forward society that we have left a few important things in the dust - primarily, quality communication.

How is it that we arrived in an era where we can communicate with almost anyone in about five different ways instantly - almost anywhere. It wasn't all that many years ago when they only way to catch someone instantly or anywhere was to cross paths with them or call them at home.

But, that's not really the crux of the issue. I think the instantization of communication has caused a large dose of non-clinical Attention Deficit Disorder with the majority of the population.

Case in point: how many times in the past month have you been chatting with someone face to face, and they reach for their phone automatically, without saying a word to you? Then they go on to answer said phone and carry on a conversation. You took the time to meet this person and yet you were instantly discarded.

I can't count how many times I've encountered this recently either personally or seeing it in progress.

Now you add instant messaging, emails, and all kinds of wizardry that Smartphones do and people are downright rude about communicating with one another.

It's like we've been trained to think that whatever phone call, email or text message that comes through won't be valid if you finish conversing with the person in front of you. Here's an experiment: let it sit. Let it wait until you've, at the very least, politely excused yourself from your other conversations. I don't believe society will have a meltdown if people relearn the art of waiting.

Along the same lines, I've had growing number of people answer their phone, only to tell me they couldn't talk right now. I recall one telling me they were in the middle of a meeting. Why answer? It's not like most messages will be harmed if they go to voicemail.

So, in this digital age of instant communication one thing we apparently are lacking in is smart communication. The kind where life gets accomplished without turning real live people into Houdini acts.

Take the time to show you value the conversation in front of you.

Sarah Day is the editor of Capital City Weekly. She can be reached at sarah.day@capweek.com.


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