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Over the past several decades, I’ve heard many impressive performances by the Juneau Symphony Orchestra, but the effect of the latest, prepared impeccably by Conductor Troy Quinn, lingers in my mind.
Review: Fabiola Kim performs with ethereal purity 110117 AE 1 For the Capital City Weekly Over the past several decades, I’ve heard many impressive performances by the Juneau Symphony Orchestra, but the effect of the latest, prepared impeccably by Conductor Troy Quinn, lingers in my mind.
Wednesday, November 01, 2017

Story last updated at 10/31/2017 - 7:36 pm

Review: Fabiola Kim performs with ethereal purity

Over the past several decades, I’ve heard many impressive performances by the Juneau Symphony Orchestra, but the effect of the latest, prepared impeccably by Conductor Troy Quinn, lingers in my mind. The opening composition, “Finlandia”, by Jean Sibelius, was stirring, and the final composition, “Symphony No. 3 in F major”, by Johannes Brahms, was well played and quite pleasing to the ear. However, the composition which these two embraced was most unusual.

Violinist Fabiola Kim came to town to play the third movement of “Violin Sonata No. 4” by Eugene Ysaye. The ethereal purity of her first tone continued throughout the composition. I was mesmerized. All of us were! The composition itself was pleasing to the ear, but Ms Kim’s performance of it was astonishing. Not a single note was one vibration away from the center of the pitch, and each fully energized tone moved irresistibly toward the next.

When the composition ended, the audience sprang to its feet with an applause that seemed to have no end. Obviously, everyone else in the audience was affected just as I was. It would have been enough to end the concert right there and have us all float home on the uplifting memory of that extraordinary performance. When Ms Kim walked back on the stage to perform an encore, I almost wished she wouldn’t, for I knew that nothing, no matter how virtuosic or well played, could match the effect that the Vaughan Williams had had on us.

It was fabulous

What she did to us

With that simple little bow.

She invaded our ears.

From our eyes she brought tears.

How she did it I never will know.

John d’Armand holds six college degrees, including the earned doctorate, and has taught at six universities. He played first-chair flute with the Tennessee All-State Band and the Indiana University Orchestra. He is Executive Director of The Paul Ulanowsky Memorial Foundation for Chamber Musicians. His broadcast career includes eighteen programs on National Public Radio.