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Halloween for many people is a night to dress up something dark and scary or fun, wacky or fanciful to either take children trick-or-treating or attend a party.
Halloween 103112 AE 1 Capital City Weekly Halloween for many people is a night to dress up something dark and scary or fun, wacky or fanciful to either take children trick-or-treating or attend a party.
Wednesday, October 31, 2012

Story last updated at 10/31/2012 - 2:28 pm

Halloween

Halloween for many people is a night to dress up something dark and scary or fun, wacky or fanciful to either take children trick-or-treating or attend a party.

Some spend weeks creating unique and homemade costumes.

Here are some fun facts about this festive day of fright and fun - October 31.

All facts come from http://facts.randomhistory.com/halloween-facts.html. Visit the site for the full listing of 40 fun facts.

• Jack O'Latern's were first carved in turnips.

• Samhainophobia is the fear of Halloween.

• Black and orange are typically associated with Halloween. Orange is a symbol of strength and endurance and, along with brown and gold, stands for the harvest and autumn. Black is typically a symbol of death and darkness and acts as a reminder that Halloween once was a festival that marked the boundaries between life and death.

• Dressing up as ghouls and other spooks originated from the ancient Celtic tradition of townspeople disguising themselves as demons and spirits. The Celts believed that disguising themselves this way would allow them to escape the notice of the real spirits wandering the streets during Samhain.

• Boston, Mass., holds the record for the most Jack O'Lanterns lit at once (30,128).

• The largest pumpkin ever measured was grown by Norm Craven, who broke the world record in 1993 with a 836 lb. pumpkin.

One reminder, please remember to be extra safe on this creeptastic day. According to the Red Cross, Halloween is the single-most risky day for kids to get hit by a vehicle. So parent, the Red Cross recommends to make sure to put reflective tape on costumes, use face-paint instead of masks and use flame-resistant costume materials. Make sure to carry (or have them carry) a flashlight, use sidewalks and only visit houses with the porch light on (and only accept candy at the door, don't go inside). For those out and about on Halloween - be extra careful when driving and watch for figures you're not used to seeing.


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