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PUBLISHED: 10:39 AM on Tuesday, October 17, 2006
Juneau Arts & Humanities Council presents ensemble I Musici di Roma

Courtesy photo
  Juneau Arts & Humanities proudly presents this legendary Italian Chamber ensemble, I Musici di Roma, at 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 21, as part of its 2006-2007 Performing Arts and Cultural Concert Series. Tickets for the concert are available at the JAHC offices, Hearthside Books, Rainy Day Books and the Observatory Bookstore. General admission is $22, $18 for seniors and students and $75 for family tickets. Tickets purchased at the door are $2 more.
"It means that every performance they give is a true expression spontaneous and meticulously polished of the talent of 12 artists."

Juneau Arts & Humanities proudly presents this legendary Italian Chamber ensemble, I Musici di Roma, at 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 21, as part of its 2006-2007 Performing Arts and Cultural Concert Series. Tickets for the concert are available at the JAHC offices, Hearthside Books, Rainy Day Books and the Observatory Bookstore. General admission is $22, $18 for seniors and students and $75 for family tickets. Tickets purchased at the door are $2 more.

Half a century of classic performances and millions of sold recordings have confirmed for I Musici the status of legend. A unique chamber orchestra comprised of six violins, two violas, two celli, one double bass and one harpsichord, The New York Times says "never does the rhythmic impulse falter, never is a note out of place."

I Musici will visit Juneau for a one-night only performance that includes Rossini's Sonata in G Major, Mozart's Rondo from Eine Kleine Nachtmusik K525, Piano Concerto K414, and Piazolla's Libertango, as well as other Italian composer favorites.The group celebrates its 55th anniversary this year, with one of the original twelve still performing as part of the ensemble.

In 1952, 12 young and promising Italian musicians, mainly roman and mostly graduates of the master classes at the Accademia di Santa Ceacilia, got together "inter pares" to create a unique chamber orchestra comprising six violins, two violas, two cellos, one double bass and one harpsichord, with the intention of revitalizing the string repertory, particularly that of the Italian composers of the "settecento."

OIt means that every performance they give is a true expression spontaneous and meticulously polished of the talent of 12 artists.O
Arturo Toscanini, upon hearing them while they were rehearsing in April 1952 at the Italian Radio, formulated the first enthusiastic reaction in front of journalists and musical personalities, even dedicating his portrait to the group with the words "bravi, bravissimi...no! la musica non muore". A few weeks earlier, on the 30th of March 1952, their public debut was an enormous success at the Accademia di Santa Cecilia; it was the starting point of an astonishing career, which in a short time catapulted them among the ranks of the great international performers.

Robert Sherman in the New York Times: "I Musici are ever since a model for all similar groups.

"They play without a conductor and each member is a soloist - It means that every performance they give is a true expression spontaneous and meticulously polished of the talent of 12 artists - In every style they bring the essential impulse of life - The result is playng of verve, stylistic purity and impeccable artistry - One is constantly impressed by their ability to achieve the full sonority of a string orchestra without sacrificing the clarity and the utter precision of a string quartet - I MUSICI achieve the most delicate nuances of shading, of balance, of phrasing - Never those the rhythmic impulse falter, never is a note out of place."


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