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“The Woman Who Married The Bear” and “The Woman Carried Away By Killer Whales:” This two-book boxed set includes the following two children’s books, published through SHI’s award-winning Baby Raven Reads program.
A complete list of Baby Raven Reads books 101117 AE 1 Courtesy of SHI, for the Capital City Weekly “The Woman Who Married The Bear” and “The Woman Carried Away By Killer Whales:” This two-book boxed set includes the following two children’s books, published through SHI’s award-winning Baby Raven Reads program.
Wednesday, October 11, 2017

Story last updated at 10/10/2017 - 8:19 pm

A complete list of Baby Raven Reads books

A complete list of Baby Raven Reads books  

Courtesy of SHI

“The Woman Who Married The Bear” and “The Woman Carried Away By Killer Whales:” This two-book boxed set includes the following two children’s books, published through SHI’s award-winning Baby Raven Reads program.

“The Woman Carried Away by Killer Whales:” When a woman is carried off by killer whales, her husband embarks on a journey to get her back. Aided by friends he meets along the way, the man follows her trail across the bottom of the sea to the Killer Whale House. Find out what happens to Nanasimgit and K’uljáad in this ancient Haida story. Illustrated by Haida artist Janine Gibbons.

“The Woman Who Married the Bear:” In this ancient Tlingit story, a woman who has insulted the bears while out berry picking meets a bear in human form. They fall in love and get married. Soon, the woman’s brothers come looking for her and the woman learns her husband is not what he appears to be. Text adapted by Tlingit writer Frank Henry Kaash Kataase. Illustrated by Haida artist Janine Gibbons.

“Let’s Go! A Harvest Story” is a children’s story that teaches about subsistence harvesting activities of the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian of Southeast Alaska. The story is by local Juneau author, Hannah Lindoff, and illustrated by Tlingit artist, Michaela Goade.

“Picking Berries” is a children’s story that teaches the English and Tlingit words for berries of Southeast Alaska. The story was written by local Juneau author Hannah Lindoff and illustrated by Tsimshian artist David Lang.

“Native Values: Living in Harmony” explores the four core cultural values of the Tlingit, Haida and Tsimshian of Southeast Alaska. Written by Tlingit Anthropologist and President of Sealaska Heritage Institute Rosita Worl, Ph.D.

“Salmon Boy: Shanyáak’utlaax” is a children’s story that teaches about respect for nature, animals and culture. It comes from an ancient Tlingit story that was edited by Johnny Marks, Hans Chester, David Katzeek, and Nora and Richard Dauenhauer. Illustrated by Tlingit artist Michaela Goade. You can also listen to “Shanyáak’utlaax” read aloud in Tlingit by elder David Katzeek.

“10 Sitka Herring:” Learn to count by tracing the fate of a herring school from 10 to one fish as they encounter Southeast Alaska predators! Herring and herring eggs are a traditional and important food in Southeast Alaska. Written by Pauline Duncan. Illustrated by David Lang. $10. Boardbook.

“Tlingit Baby Eagle:” In Southeast Alaska, the Tlingit and Haida are divided into Raven and Eagle groups. Learn about the beings and creatures that belong to the Eagle clans! Eagle clan illustrations by Crystal Worl. Environmental illustrations by Nobu Koch. $10. Boardbook.

“Tlingit Baby Raven:” In Southeast Alaska, the Tlingit and Haida are divided into Raven and Eagle groups. Learn about the beings and creatures that belong to the Raven clans! Eagle clan illustrations by Crystal Worl. Environmental illustrations by Nobu Koch. $10. Boardbook.

“Haida Baby Eagle:” In Southeast Alaska, the Tlingit and Haida are divided into Raven and Eagle groups. “Haida Baby Eagle” teaches the English and Xaad Kíl (Haida language) words for Eagle clan crests. The clan crests were illustrated by Crystal Worl, and the Southeast Alaska environmental illustrations were made by Nobu Koch. Benjamin Young edited the Xaad Kíl words.

“Haida Baby Raven:” In Southeast Alaska, the Tlingit and Haida are divided into Raven and Eagle groups. “Haida Baby Raven” teaches the English and Xaad Kíl (Haida language) words for Raven clan crests. The clan crests were illustrated by Crystal Worl, and the Southeast Alaska environmental illustrations were made by Nobu Koch. Benjamin Young edited the Xaad Kíl words. Learn about the beings and creatures that belong to the Eagle clans.

“Origins of Rivers and Streams: A Raven Story:” This book is derived from an ancient creation story that has been passed from generation to generation for thousands of years. Adapted from oral histories by Pauline Duncan and illustrated by Lindsay Carron, it is also available as part of a three-book set that includes “Raven and the Box of Daylight” and “Raven Brings us Fire.”

“Raven and the Box of Daylight:” This book is derived from an ancient creation story that has been passed from generation to generation for thousands of years. Adapted from oral histories by Pauline Duncan and illustrated by Lindsay Carron, it is also available as part of a three-book set that includes “Origins of Rivers and Streams” and “Raven Brings Us Fire.”

“Raven Brings Us Fire:” This book is derived from an ancient creation story that has been passed from generation to generation for thousands of years. Adapted from oral histories by Pauline Duncan and illustrated by Lindsay Carron, it is also available as part of a three-book set that includes “Raven and the Box of Daylight” and “Origins of Rivers and Streams.”

“Colors:” This book teaches the Lingít words for colors through comparisons to animals, plants and natural objects found in Southeast Alaska. The Lingít words were compiled by Yarrow Vaara and the book was illustrated by David Lang.

“Tlingit Alphabet:” This is a two-book set edited by Katrina Hotch, Linda Belarde and Keri Eggleston, reviewed by traditional scholar Dr. Walter Soboleff and illustrated by Crystal Worl.