Health
Alaska's Adult Protective Services unit presented its Community Commitment Award to Alzheimer's Resource of Alaska for supporting Alaskans with Alzheimer's or related dementia, and their caregivers, family and friends. The nonprofit's services have been increasingly important as the state's senior population grows at the fastest rate in the nation.
DHSS recognizes Alzheimer's Resource of Alaska for advocacy 092513 HEALTH 1 Capital City Weekly Alaska's Adult Protective Services unit presented its Community Commitment Award to Alzheimer's Resource of Alaska for supporting Alaskans with Alzheimer's or related dementia, and their caregivers, family and friends. The nonprofit's services have been increasingly important as the state's senior population grows at the fastest rate in the nation.
Wednesday, September 25, 2013

Story last updated at 9/25/2013 - 1:35 pm

DHSS recognizes Alzheimer's Resource of Alaska for advocacy

Alaska's Adult Protective Services unit presented its Community Commitment Award to Alzheimer's Resource of Alaska for supporting Alaskans with Alzheimer's or related dementia, and their caregivers, family and friends. The nonprofit's services have been increasingly important as the state's senior population grows at the fastest rate in the nation.

Currently 6,000 Alaskans experience Alzheimer's, a 172 percent increase from 2,200 in 1990.

"Alzheimer's Resource of Alaska served 120 communities statewide in fiscal year 2013," said Duane Mayes, director of the Division of Senior and Disabilities Services. "We give them our heartfelt thanks for all that they do to support this vulnerable population."

"We're honored to have been selected," said Dulce Nobre, executive director of Alzheimer's Resource of Alaska. "In order to accomplish our mission of keeping our clients in their home and community as long as is feasible, we need to be sure they're safe. We work well as partners with Adult Protective Services to accomplish that common goal."

The award was presented during a resource fair in the Anchorage Senior Activities Center. The fair also featured presentations from Alaska agencies that work to prevent and respond to harm to vulnerable adults, including financial exploitation. A similar fair is slated for Sept. 27 in Fairbanks' public library.

Alaskans should call Adult Protective Services, 1-800-478-9996, if they believe a vulnerable adult may be being harmed or exploited, or may be unable to care for himself or herself, or 911 if a vulnerable adult is at immediate risk. For details, visit http://dhss.alaska.gov/dsds/Pages/aps.


Loading...