Archives
PUBLISHED: 5:08 PM on Tuesday, August 29, 2006
Falling into some good reads

Photo by Rosie Milligan
  Children listen to story time at the Downtown Juneau Library. The fall months feature several new releases for children and adults.
You're making a list. You're checking it twice.

Wait a minute. Isn't it a little early to be planning for Christmas?

Maybe. But book season is just getting started.

Fall is the best time to find new books by the authors you love, and to discover some new favorites.

Check this out:

September

Are you so bad you're good? Author and actor Kim Cattrall kicks off the new season with her first children's book "Everything I Learned About Being a Girl" (Little, Brown) and you'll find that right at the beginning of the month.

Your children will also be glad to know there's a new Artemis Fowl book coming out, as well as a new book about Harriet Tubman, a new book from Jamie Lee Curtis, and a new Lemony Snicket book due out, just in time for the new school year.

Grown-ups will want to make repeated trips to the bookstore or library because Arianna Huffington has a new book out, as well as John Le Carre, Brad Meltzer, Joe Meno, and Alice McDermott. Author Cecelia Rivenbark weighs in with "Stop Dressing Your Six-Year-Old Like a Skank: And Other Words of Delicate Southern Wisdom" (St. Martin's).

Mystery fans will race to find "Under Orders" by Dick Francis (Putnam) and "The Mephisto Club" by Tess Gerritsen (Ballantine).

Oprah author Janet Fitch will release "Paint It Black" (Little, Brown) in September. Walter Mosley has a new book coming out. So does Bill O'Reilly, Daniel Goleman, Carl Weber (with Mary B. Morrison), Eric Van Lustbader, Roger Ebert, and Mitch Albom.

October


Still not satisfied? Believe it or not, October has more possibilities for your winter reading.

Start out your month with "Christmas Letters" by Debbie Macomber (Mira) or "Motor Mouth" by Janet Evanovich (HarperCollins). You'll find "Finding Noel" by Richard Paul Evans (Simon & Schuster) this month, as well as "The Innocent Man" by John Grisham (Doubleday), "What Came Before He Shot Her" by Elizabeth George (HarperCollins), "The Audacity of Hope" by Barack Obama (Crown), "Love Don't Live Here No More" by Snoop Dog (Atria), "The Collectors" by David Baldacci (Warner), and "The Bancroft Strategy" by Robert Ludlum (Thomas Dunne).

October seems to be the month for blockbuster books: Stephen King's "Lisey's Story" (Scribner) arrives this month, as well as "H.R.H." by Danielle Steel (Delacorte), "Dear John" by Nicholas Sparks (Warner), "The Book of the Dead" by Patricia Cornwell (Putnam) and "The Mitford Bedside Companion" by Jan Karon (Viking).

Look for new biographies on George H.W. Bush, Audrey Hepburn, Jimmy Stewart, Bill Bryson and The Donald.

Get ready for your holiday kitchening with new cookbooks from Paula Deen, The Barefoot Contessa, and the Joy of Cooking anniversary book.

Your children will want to find a new book by Madonna, Emeril, Gloria Estefan, George R.R. Martin, Cornelia Funke and Chris Van Allsburg.

November

We're still not done, and neither is your wish list. In the month of November, the publishing world slows down, but not much. Look:

"Wild Fire" by Nelson DeMille (Warner) comes out in November. So does "The Mystical Life of Jesus: An Uncommon Perspective on the Life of Christ" by Sylvia Browne (Dutton), "Born in Death" by Nora Roberts writing as J.D. Robb (Putnam), "The Rising Tide: A Novel of the Second World War" by Jeff Shaara (Ballantine), "Santa Cruise" by Mary Higgins Clark and Carol Higgins Clark (Scribner), "Cross" by James Patterson (Little, Brown) and "Brother Odd" by Dean Koontz (Bantam)

Whew. Are you going to have enough time to read all these great books?

Okay, now here comes the disclaimer part: release dates and titles are subject to change, but your bookstore or librarian can help you find these and other books by authors you'll love.

So get out your pen. Make your list and check it twice, pile the books next to your favorite chair and settle in. The possibilities for reading are endless this fall.


Loading...