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Sealaska Heritage Institute has invited Washington-based Tsimshian master artist David A. Boxley to teach formline design to inmates this week at Lemon Creek Correctional Center in Juneau. Boxley, an advanced Tsimshian language student, has also been leading language mini-immersion classes in the evenings at the Walter Soboleff Building since Monday.
Boxley leads formline design classes at prison through SHI 082615 NEWS 1 Capital City Weekly Sealaska Heritage Institute has invited Washington-based Tsimshian master artist David A. Boxley to teach formline design to inmates this week at Lemon Creek Correctional Center in Juneau. Boxley, an advanced Tsimshian language student, has also been leading language mini-immersion classes in the evenings at the Walter Soboleff Building since Monday.
Wednesday, August 26, 2015

Story last updated at 8/26/2015 - 2:22 pm

Boxley leads formline design classes at prison through SHI

Sealaska Heritage Institute has invited Washington-based Tsimshian master artist David A. Boxley to teach formline design to inmates this week at Lemon Creek Correctional Center in Juneau. Boxley, an advanced Tsimshian language student, has also been leading language mini-immersion classes in the evenings at the Walter Soboleff Building since Monday.

The institute has sponsored formline design classes to connect inmates to their culture and to help them earn a living upon release, said SHI President Rosita Worl in a release.

Boxley is a well-known Tsimshian carver and dancer from Metlakatla. The main entry of the Walter Soboleff Building features his piece "Am'ala: Wil Mangaa da Ha'lidzogat" (The Man Who Held Up The Earth), thought to be the largest carved-and-painted Tsimshian house front in the world.

SHI co-sponsored the evening language classes, which were organized by Nancy Barnes. Haayk Foundation also is a co-sponsor.

The classes at Lemon Creek Correctional Center continue through Thursday, as do the Tsmishian classes at the Living History Center in the Walter Soboleff Building.

For more information, visit www.sealaskaheritage.org.