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These are the ballot measures up for vote during the primary, courtesy of www.elections.alaska.gov. For more information about the implications of these on you and your community, contact your local representative, or visit the election website at www.elections.alaska.gov.
Ballot Measures on August 24 081810 NEWS 2 Capital City Weekly These are the ballot measures up for vote during the primary, courtesy of www.elections.alaska.gov. For more information about the implications of these on you and your community, contact your local representative, or visit the election website at www.elections.alaska.gov.
Wednesday, August 18, 2010

Story last updated at 8/18/2010 - 12:23 pm

Ballot Measures on August 24

These are the ballot measures up for vote during the primary, courtesy of www.elections.alaska.gov. For more information about the implications of these on you and your community, contact your local representative, or visit the election website at www.elections.alaska.gov.

Ballot Measure No. 1:

Initiative Prohibiting the Use of Public Funds to Lobby or Campaign; and Prohibiting Holders of Government Contracts and Family Members from Making Political Contributions.

This bill would ban the use of public funds for political campaigns and lobbying by state and local government agencies, and school districts. Public funds could not be used to support or oppose ballot measures, lobby to pass a law, or ask for public funding. Any entity that lobbies or campaigns would be barred from receiving public funds. It would ban political contributions by government contract holders and members of their families. It would ban legislators and their staff from being employed by government contract holders for two years after leaving state service. The bill has criminal and civil penalties.

Ballot Measure No. 2:

Abortion for Minor Requires Notice to or Consent from Parent or Guardian or Through Judicial Bypass

This bill would change the law to require notice to the parent or guardian of a female under the age of 18 before she has an abortion. Currently, a female under 18 may have an abortion with no notice to her parent or guardian. The bill includes detailed requirements for the notice, including that the minor's doctor must provide the notice at least 48 hours before the procedure. This waiting period would be waived if a parent or guardian gives consent. The bill also allows the minor to go to court to authorize an abortion without giving notice to her parent or guardian. The minor could ask the court to excuse her from school to attend the hearings and to have the abortion. The court could direct the school not to tell the minor's parent or guardian of the minor's pregnancy, abortion, or absence from school.

The bill allows a minor who is a victim of abuse by her parent or guardian to get an abortion without notice or consent. To do this, the minor and an adult relative or

authorized official with personal knowledge of the abuse must sign a notarized statement about the abuse.

The bill would make it a felony for a doctor to knowingly violate the statutory notice provisions for giving the minor's parents notice of the minor's intent to have an abortion. The bill sets out a doctor's defense for performing an abortion without first providing notice or obtaining consent where the minor faces an immediate threat of death or permanent physical harm from continuing the pregnancy.

Doctors who perform abortions on a minor would have to submit reports.

This bill amends a law passed by the legislature in 1997 that is on the books but which may not be enforced because of a Court decision. The 1997 law was known as the "Parental Consent Act." This bill makes changes to the 1997 law to address concerns in the Court decision and seeks to make the law, as amended, enforceable.

City of Ketchikan special municipal election

Residents in Ketchikan will have the opportunity to vote on two additional propositions in regards to the new city library project:

Proposition No. 1: If the City constructs a new public library after the effective date hereof, the library shall be located on property anywhere within the city limits of the City of Ketchikan, and the location of the library is not restricted to city-owned property or to any specific area bordered by certain streets.

Proposition No. 2: Shall the City Charter be amended by adding a new Section 7-8 to Article 7 LOCAL PUBLIC IMPROVEMENTS to read as follows: Section 7-8. Public Library. If the City constructs a new public library after the effective date hereof, the library shall be located on city-owned property in the Downtown of the City, which is defined as the area bordered by Grant Street to the North, Front Street to the West, Mill Street and Totem Way to the South, and Creek Street to the East, to Park Avenue, thence to Grant Street.

There will be two separate polling stations, one for the city special election, and one for the state primary election, adjacent to each other in each city precinct. For more information about the new library project, visit the website: www.ournewketchikanlibrary.org.

What you need to bring with you to the polls:

You'll have to present some sort of identification when you go to vote. Here are the listed approved documents: a signed voter ID card, driver's license, state ID card, military ID card, passport, hunting or fishing license; or other current or valid photo identification.

You may also present one of the following forms of identification if it includes your name and current address: a current utility bill or pay check, government check or bank statement, or other government issued document.

How to register to vote:

The deadline for registration is 30 days before the election, so it's too late to register for the primary this year. However, it's not too late to register for the subsequent election later this year. For more information, call your regional election office at 465-3021, or visit the website at www.elections.alaska.gov.


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