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My dad loves fishing as much as I love crafting. I only fully realized this last weekend on a family fishing trip we took. As dad pulled out the tackle box, getting the gear ready to drop, I spied a smaller box scrawled with the words "BEADS GUMPUCKY."
Tackle your accessories on the open sea 081209 AE 2 Capital City Weekly My dad loves fishing as much as I love crafting. I only fully realized this last weekend on a family fishing trip we took. As dad pulled out the tackle box, getting the gear ready to drop, I spied a smaller box scrawled with the words "BEADS GUMPUCKY."

Photos By Tanna Peters

A set of pearls fit for any sea princess. The supplies for these accessories came right out of a tackle box.


Photos By Tanna Peters

The supplies for these accessories came right out of a tackle box.


Photos By Tanna Peters

A necklace for the fisher who goes with the flow. The supplies for these accessories came right out of a tackle box.

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Wednesday, August 12, 2009

Story last updated at 8/12/2009 - 1:17 pm

Tackle your accessories on the open sea

My dad loves fishing as much as I love crafting. I only fully realized this last weekend on a family fishing trip we took. As dad pulled out the tackle box, getting the gear ready to drop, I spied a smaller box scrawled with the words "BEADS GUMPUCKY."

I'll admit, I was intrigued by gumpucky, but what really sent my heart aflutter was that one sweet word: beads. "There are beads in fishing?" I asked my father with sudden intensity. When he looked up I saw a gleam in his eyes so familiar to me; excitement to share the love of his craft, fishing.

Don't get me wrong, I have fished with my dad before. But living in a household surrounded by women, with the only male ally a cat named Sparky, you can understand how he sometimes felt his interests were underappreciated. And though he knew my interest at that moment was probably short-lived and 90 percent related to that one word "beads," he forged ahead in an attempt to teach me his craft. And this time I listened wholeheartedly.

Apparently there are not only beads in trolling for salmon, there are also swivels, snaps, and clasps that suspiciously resemble jump rings and jewelry makings. And of course, there is the ubiquitous Southeast fisherman's friend, the Hoochie, in a rainbow of dazzling colors.

I watched as my father delicately threaded through one of these sparkling hoochies, running a neon head filler inside, followed by three medium beads and the all-important hook. As he wrapped a half-frozen, salted and smelly herring onto said hook, an idea donned on me. I would make jewelry out of these accoutrements of the open briny, connecting my craft with my father's, and creating a hip set of Alaskan bling. Also, taking a cue from my crafty mom, whose endless collection of topically-related earrings make every day a joy to adorn oneself, I figured this could be a great good luck charm for the upcoming Golden North Salmon Derby.

So, I absconded with dad's tackle box and got to work. For the upscale fisher, a posh strand of clear beads strung upon monofilament (that's just fishing line's fancy name) resembling a set of pearls fit for any sea-princess was held together by two Hawaiian snaps. For the fisher who goes with the flow, I created a metallic bohemian to-do made primarily of repeated barrel swivels alternating with Hawaiian snaps and swivel chains. One crisp white hoochie entangled itself asymmetrically in the metallic barrage, giving a humorous nod to the necklace's oceanic origins. I told my dad I would take it apart and give him back his tackle when I finished. I hope he's not mad when he reads this!

If you too are looking to connect your crafty pursuits to a loved one's adventurous side, just remember to think outside the box by learning, creating, and connecting. And one last piece of advice: know when and when not combine crafts, because jewelry out of fishing tackle might be a good idea, but perfume out of fish oil is probably not.

Tanna Peters is a crafter and designer from wonderful, rainy Southeast Alaska. For further directions and pictures on this project go to www.suiteliving.blogspot.com


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