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PUBLISHED: 12:33 PM on Wednesday, May 25, 2005
Juneau students score at science fair

  The team of Joey Bosworth and Erika O'Sullivan, from JDHS, placed 3rd at the International Science and Engineering Fair in Phoenix, May 8-14 with their project " The Effect of Age and Succession Type on Forest Overstory and Understory Composition".
The Southeast Alaska Regional Science Fair contingent from Juneau Douglas High school returned from the Intel International Science and Engineering Fair (ISEF) with awards and inspiration.

There were 14 categories in which more than 1,400 finalists from all over the world competed. The team of Joey Bosworth and Erika O'Sullivan, from JDHS, placed 3rd in their category of Botany, with their project " The Effect of Age and Succession Type on Forest Overstory and Understory Composition".

The top finalists in the 2005 Southeast Alaska Science Fair (held in Juneau on March 4 & 5) went to Phoenix to compete in the International Science and Engineering Fair, May 8-14. In addition to Joey Bosworth and Erika O'Sullivan, Sara Bogert (How Carbon Source Affects the Process of Microbial Sulfate Reduction in Mine Tailings) and Sam Post (How Wing Curve Affects Lift Force) displayed their projects and competed in the international fair. The team of Clay Werthheimer and Brenna Heintz (Seasonal Dynamics of Polynuclear Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Gastineau Channel), who qualified as observers to the Phoenix fair, were also regional winners of the Stockholm Jr. Water Prize. They went on to win at the state level and will compete at the national level in Portland in June for the chance to go to Stockholm.

High school students from more than 40 countries qualify for Intel ISEF (International Science and Engineering Fair) by winning at affiliated regional or national fairs. The chance to win a share of $3 million in prizes adds to the excitement at the event, but many students describe bigger motivations - developing an alternative energy source, learning about a distant star, improving mobility for the disabled, or contributing new understanding.

During the week in Phoenix, students traded pins, learned about the science done by other participants, and competed for scholarships, tuition, grants, computers, and trips to science meetings in other parts of the world. They also had a chance to talk with Nobel Laureates and get acquainted with fellow students from around the globe.


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