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WRANGELL - The James & Elsie Nolan Center, City and Borough of Wrangell, United States Forest Service, and Braided River announce that a new exhibit - Salmon in the Trees: Life in Alaska's Tongass Rain Forest - is now on permanent display in the community of Wrangell at the James & Elsie Nolan Center.
New Salmon in the Trees exhibit on display in Wrangell 052312 NEWS 1 Capital City Weekly WRANGELL - The James & Elsie Nolan Center, City and Borough of Wrangell, United States Forest Service, and Braided River announce that a new exhibit - Salmon in the Trees: Life in Alaska's Tongass Rain Forest - is now on permanent display in the community of Wrangell at the James & Elsie Nolan Center.
Wednesday, May 23, 2012

Story last updated at 5/23/2012 - 11:52 am

New Salmon in the Trees exhibit on display in Wrangell

WRANGELL - The James & Elsie Nolan Center, City and Borough of Wrangell, United States Forest Service, and Braided River announce that a new exhibit - Salmon in the Trees: Life in Alaska's Tongass Rain Forest - is now on permanent display in the community of Wrangell at the James & Elsie Nolan Center.

The Salmon in the Trees exhibit features 15 large-format photographic prints based on the book of the same title by acclaimed nature photographer Amy Gulick. Published by Braided River, the book is the recipient of an Independent Publisher Book Award and a Nautilus Book Award. The book tells the story of the Tongass rain forest of Southeast Alaska and the rich cycle of life that has thrived for millennia.

"The Tongass is a place where salmon, trees, bears, eagles, and people are all connected in a glorious show of life," said Gulick. "There is no other place like it in the world, and I want people to know how special it is."

At 17 million acres, about the size of West Virginia, the Tongass is America's largest national forest. With some of the highest densities of bears and bald eagles on Earth, it is teeming with life and adventure. The region is also home to the Tlingit, Haida, and Tshimshian, whose cultures are deeply connected on a local level to this forest of global significance.

"Salmon in the Trees is a celebration not only of the Tongass, but of the local people who live and recreate here," said Erin Uloth, U.S. Forest Service, Tongass National Forest. "It is a perfect reflection of how Alaskans celebrate their heritage, make their living, and find their inspiration from the forest in their daily lives."

Wrangell Mayor Jeremy Maxand said the exhibit provides a visual reminder of the importance of forests and fish to his community's way of life, culture, and economy.

Commercial salmon fishing in Southeast Alaska is a billion dollar industry and employs thousands of people, including many residents of Wrangell.

"While we see this majestic and amazing place every day from our doorsteps, we are excited to have one more way to share it with visitors and show how the important interconnection between our forests and our fish makes the place where we live possible," said Maxand.


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