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On Saturday, May 6 the Hoonah Volunteer Fire Department (HVFD) responded to a trailer house fire on Garteeni Highway.
Hoonah home lost to fire, community fundraises for displaced family 051717 AE 1 Capital City Weekly On Saturday, May 6 the Hoonah Volunteer Fire Department (HVFD) responded to a trailer house fire on Garteeni Highway.

Trailer in Hoonah on Garteeni Highway on Saturday, May 6. Structure was deemed a total loss. Photo by firefighter Ryan Neal.


Trailer in Hoonah on Garteeni Highway on Saturday, May 6. Structure was deemed a total loss. Photo by firefighter Ryan Neal.


Trailer in Hoonah on Garteeni Highway on Saturday, May 6. Structure was deemed a total loss. Photo by firefighter Ryan Neal.

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Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Story last updated at 5/16/2017 - 5:10 pm

Hoonah home lost to fire, community fundraises for displaced family

On Saturday, May 6 the Hoonah Volunteer Fire Department (HVFD) responded to a trailer house fire on Garteeni Highway. The home, which belonged to Atti Wark and his son Carlos, was unoccupied at the time of the fire.; the structure was deemed a total loss, fire chief and arson investigator of the HVFD Paul Comolli told the Capital City Weekly. He said the wood stove in the residence is the suspected cause of the fire.

Currently, the Hoonah community is collecting monetary donations as well as basic items like clothes, houseware, blankets and food for the displaced family. OG Schoonover started a Go Fund Me fundraiser on behalf of the Wark family. As of print time, it has $2,550. “Atti and Carlos Fire Damage Fund” can be found at: https://www.gofundme.com/eyz7xrjv.

The last time the HVFD fought a trailer fire was on Oct. 14, 2015. That trailer was lost as a result of electrical pipe thaw heat tape that overloaded and caught fire, Comolli said.

“Due to Hoonah’s size response times are quick, usually a few minutes. Even with that advantage both these trailers were lost before (the fire department’s) arrival. This makes control and containment of the fire the main objective,” Comolli said. “We cannot emphasize enough that good working smoke detectors are necessary. Fire suppression such as sprinkler systems save structures and lives. Even inexpensive auto extinguishers under range hoods can stop kitchen fires before they spread.”

He went on to encourage residents to have and know how to operate fire extinguishers as well as have a fire escape plan.

“If you aren’t sure if your home is fire safe take a moment and check it. Look at outlets, power cords and flammable items near heat sources. Maintenance of furnaces, boilers and wood stoves should not be neglected,” Comolli said. “Hoonah residents: If it looks bad and you aren’t sure call us for an inspection. We’d rather prevent a fire than fight one.”

Contact interim editor Clara Miller at clara.miller@capweek.com.