Outdoors
The coastal waters of Southeast Alaska are a fly rodder's paradise. Ocean and islands create a tapestry of brilliant water and trackless forest where glaciers descend mountain spires to the sea. With water types as diverse as the land that embraces them, anglers in Southeast Alaska have a smorgasbord of waters and locations to target depending on angling preference and fish run timing. These waters include bays, estuaries or coastal straits; broad rivers or small creeks; and chains of lakes or brackish salt chucks. But during the commencement of our summer salmon runs, no single location offers better angling opportunities for hot, aggressive fish than our local estuaries.
Estuary angling: It's all about the tides 050609 OUTDOORS 1 Capital City Weekly The coastal waters of Southeast Alaska are a fly rodder's paradise. Ocean and islands create a tapestry of brilliant water and trackless forest where glaciers descend mountain spires to the sea. With water types as diverse as the land that embraces them, anglers in Southeast Alaska have a smorgasbord of waters and locations to target depending on angling preference and fish run timing. These waters include bays, estuaries or coastal straits; broad rivers or small creeks; and chains of lakes or brackish salt chucks. But during the commencement of our summer salmon runs, no single location offers better angling opportunities for hot, aggressive fish than our local estuaries.

Photo By Rich Culver

A solitary fly angler fishes an estuary channel during a flooding tide. Salmon and char gather at the heads of estuaries during these tidal periods.

Wednesday, May 06, 2009

Story last updated at 5/6/2009 - 10:46 am

Estuary angling: It's all about the tides
On the Fly

The coastal waters of Southeast Alaska are a fly rodder's paradise. Ocean and islands create a tapestry of brilliant water and trackless forest where glaciers descend mountain spires to the sea. With water types as diverse as the land that embraces them, anglers in Southeast Alaska have a smorgasbord of waters and locations to target depending on angling preference and fish run timing. These waters include bays, estuaries or coastal straits; broad rivers or small creeks; and chains of lakes or brackish salt chucks. But during the commencement of our summer salmon runs, no single location offers better angling opportunities for hot, aggressive fish than our local estuaries.

Most estuaries in Southeast Alaska have relatively long tidal flats. These flats are exposed only during moderate to low tides, and anglers should fish both periods within the tides for best results. Similar to warm water flats fishing or still water angling in shallow lakes, the fish here cruise in channels where they are sometimes visible. But it takes concentration to see them and an understanding of the surrounding area, and with that comes a word of caution: know and respect the tides.

Carrying a local tide book and consulting it often is critical to safe and successful fishing in Southeast Alaska estuaries, especially when tidal fluctuations on some days can be as much as 22 feet. If that sounds big, it is, and the tide can quickly creep up on an unwary angler at an alarming rate, suddenly turning a day of exciting fishing into a life-threatening swim. However, these same tidal dynamics that can be so dangerous also bring processions of fresh fish into the estuaries. During the summer salmon runs, schools of fish gather in bays and channels awaiting the push of the flood tide to move into and through the estuary before navigating to their home waters. This is the prime fishing time, and the action can be electrifying. Sometimes schools of migrating fish are so dense that they displace enough water that it almost appears as if boulders are marching upstream.

Ebb tides are worth fishing, too, especially near the bottom of the tidal cycle. I've noted on many occasions that an ebb tide in the early morning hours usually leaves a generous number of fresh fish holding in the channels, and most will aggressively grab the first fly they see. So once again, note your tide book to target these channels during morning ebb tides. Stalking and sight casting to fresh, bright fish resting in estuary channels or braids is not only exciting, but also highly rewarding. Once familiar with stalking and sight casting to resting fish in estuary channels, many fly rodders become passionately addicted to ebb tide estuary angling. The fishing is more technical, as it requires accurate casting skills, but it also opens up more opportunity within the tidal cycle to fish.

It won't be long until the summer angling season is upon. Our local estuaries will once again be the place of heightened activity dictated by the cyclical nature of the tides. Learn to known your local estuaries and become intimately familiar with their relationship between the fish that roam there and the tides that quietly dictate their presence. Good luck, and tight lines!

Rich Culver is a fly-fishing freelance writer and photographer and member of the Scott Fly Rod Company's Pro Staff. He can be reached at flywater@alaska.net.


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