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The Capital City Weekly did well at this year’s Alaska Press Club Awards, with its staff and columnists winning seven awards in total – two first places, three second place awards, and two third places.
Capital City Weekly takes home seven awards for arts, culture, columns 042617 AE 1 Capital City Weekly The Capital City Weekly did well at this year’s Alaska Press Club Awards, with its staff and columnists winning seven awards in total – two first places, three second place awards, and two third places.

One of the seven honors Capital City Weekly writers received for this year's Alaska Press Club awards. Photo by Angelo Saggiomo.

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Story last updated at 4/25/2017 - 2:46 pm

Capital City Weekly takes home seven awards for arts, culture, columns

The Capital City Weekly did well at this year’s Alaska Press Club Awards, with its staff and columnists winning seven awards in total – two first places, three second place awards, and two third places.

Geoff Kirsch, who reviews Perseverance Theatre plays for the Capital City Weekly, won first place for “When equality loses its self-evidence,” a review of “We Hold These Truths.”

“This is a very well-written review that concisely homes in on how politically relevant this World War II-themed play is in America today, post-election. The review eerily captures both this scar on American history while at the same time linking the play’s content to the equally real dangers of xenophobia in Trump’s America today,” the judge wrote.

Former columnist Jim Hale, author of “On Writing,” won the Suzan Nightingale Award for Best Columnist for the second year in a row.

“Hale’s pieces are strikingly funny and reveal a writer so centered and confident his craft that readers find themselves laughing out loud and knowingly nodding. Great stuff!” wrote the judge.

Freelancer and former Juneau Empire reporter Melissa Griffiths won second place in “Best Illustration” for the graphic short story “Welcome to the Indian School.”

“This piece has a very unique visual style, but why it stands out is the appreciation of the work and research that went into the creation of this project and… ensuring its success,” the judge wrote.

Capital City Weekly editor Mary Catharine Martin won second place for “best short feature,” for “Folk Fest performer highlight: Theo ‘FySH’ Houck,” second place in “Best Arts Reporting” for “Breathing Life into a new beginning,” and third place for “Best Culture Reporting” for “Going Home.” Both of the latter two are articles about the return of the Huna Tlingit to Glacier Bay in August 2016.

“This story captures the joy and celebration of the Huna tribe returning to its ancestral homeland through vivid description of the carved dugout canoes they came in on to Glacier Bay as well as the special weaved robe for dancing. I can just imagine the festivities with song and drum, too, celebrating this tribal homecoming to the Huna Tribal House. The story makes clear how unique this partnership is between the 100-year-old National Park Service and tribe to build a tribal anchor for their homecoming, hundreds of years after the tribe fled due to an advancing glacier” wrote the judge of the “Arts Reporting” category.

Dick Callahan won third place for “Best Sports or Outdoors Column” for “Woodshed Kings.” It’s the second year in a row he’s placed in the contest. This year’s judge did not write comments for any of the winners, but last year’s noted that Callahan is “a fantastic storyteller.”

Though it wasn’t for the Capital City Weekly, staff writer Clara Miller won first place in the “short feature” category for an article written in the Juneau Empire: “For Juneau babies, safe sleep comes in a box.”

“Strong writing, and you did a good job of incorporating in the broader facts without losing the tone of the overall feature. Nice work,” the judge wrote.

A big congratulations to all the Capital City Weekly winners, and to the Capital City Weekly’s sister publication, the Juneau Empire, for its 21 awards.