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Imagine living your whole life outside, facing the cold and taking cover from the sun. Being starved and ignored. Living in chicken-wire cages stacked on top of your siblings. This is what dogs from puppy mills go through every day. Puppy mills are an act of cruelty and should be stopped.
Floyd Dryden Essay: Puppy mills, seriously? 041812 SPEAKINGOUT 1 SAGA Southeast Regional Coordinator Imagine living your whole life outside, facing the cold and taking cover from the sun. Being starved and ignored. Living in chicken-wire cages stacked on top of your siblings. This is what dogs from puppy mills go through every day. Puppy mills are an act of cruelty and should be stopped.
Wednesday, April 18, 2012

Story last updated at 4/18/2012 - 11:10 am

Floyd Dryden Essay: Puppy mills, seriously?

Imagine living your whole life outside, facing the cold and taking cover from the sun. Being starved and ignored. Living in chicken-wire cages stacked on top of your siblings. This is what dogs from puppy mills go through every day. Puppy mills are an act of cruelty and should be stopped.

Most dogs you buy at pet stores come from puppy mills. In fact, 99 percent of them do. Even if your local pet store owner seems nice, he is probably buying his dogs off the back of a truck where hundreds of puppies are crammed. Dogs from puppy mills are not raised in proper living environments, so when buying dogs from pet stores you are supporting puppy mills, and your dog will most likely have medical problems such as respiratory problems, infections and matting of the fur.

Puppy mills endanger animals. In August 2007 in Boxton, Maine, 200 puppies were saved, and all of them were sick and/or starving. The puppies that live in puppy mills live in overcrowded, unsanitary homes without ample veterinary care, socialization, water or food. To ease cleanup, the dogs live in cages with chicken wire bottoms. They do this so the feces will drain out. Living in these types of cages will damage the dogs' paws.

Last but not least, with puppy mills, the profit is put before the well-being of the animals. To best profit, female dogs are bred every chance they get from when they first go into heat and up until they can no longer reproduce. And after they can no longer reproduce, they are often killed. From September 2007 to September 2008, Mr. Monrfield, one puppy mill owner, made $1.8 million, and none of that was put toward the well-being of the dogs.

To conclude, puppy mills are wrong and should be demolished. They are an endangerment to the animals, the profit is put before the well being of the animals and dogs from pet stores often come from puppy mills. I'd like to close with a word by Margaret Mead, an American cultural writer, scientist and anthropologist: "Never doubt that a small group of concerned citizens can change the world. Indeed that's the only thing that ever has."

Madison Polley is an eighth-grader at Floyd Dryden Middle School. This essay is part of an annual project with Samantha Davis' language arts classes at Floyd Dryden Middle School. A student editorial board selected student essays for publication in the Capital City Weekly.


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