Speakingout
Editor's note: This is part of a series of essays written last fall by Floyd Dryden eighth grade students in Samantha Davis' class.
The people should vote on government spending 032509 SPEAKINGOUT 2 Floyd Dryden Student Editor's note: This is part of a series of essays written last fall by Floyd Dryden eighth grade students in Samantha Davis' class.
Wednesday, March 25, 2009

Story last updated at 3/25/2009 - 10:57 am

The people should vote on government spending
Floyd Dryden essay

Editor's note: This is part of a series of essays written last fall by Floyd Dryden eighth grade students in Samantha Davis' class.

In October, Congress passed a bill that would give banks in debt a large sum of money, out of a $700 billion dollars that would be paid by the taxpayers of America. Our then-President, George W. Bush, suggested this large sum of money. It was passed after contemplation from Congress, but not by the people. I think that had the people voted, it would have failed miserably. There should be voting on government spending over $1 million by the people instead of only by Congress.

First of all, let's examine the bad $700 billion bill that Congress passed. Many people called the governor of their respective state and said that they did not want to see this bill passed, although there were a few people who wanted it to pass. When asked, Jeren Smith said, "I thought it was pointless, stupid, and the people who passed it must have been idiots and signed in crayon." Once I had found out, I told my father, and he violently struck the hammer he was holding into the floor in front of him. There were quite a lot of people who did not approve of this bill, and some may not approve of the next one.

In addition, let's look at a newer bill that Congress was trying to pass, this time for the automotive industry. On November 13, Senate Democrats pressed ahead with plans to vote on a $25 billion emergency bill for the automotive industry. But what they don't do is lower the amount that the CEO's get paid, seeing as it is millions a year. When asked, Dale Johnston, age 50, said, "It is just pathetic. Those CEO's get paid so much, yet they can't even lower their own wage to save the company. There they are spending the taxpayers' money and none of their own, why our money and not theirs?"

Lastly, it's our money, so we should say where it goes, not our government. When asked, a teacher at Floyd Dryden said, "I like to have a say in how my money is spent." Another student at the same school said, "Well, it's our money. We should be able to say where it goes." I'm not sure about you or what your thought on the matter might be, but I certainly want to say where my money is spent.

If we choose where our money went, instead of the government, we could be better off. Politicians pass bills that help them or their friends and we foot the bill; we shouldn't have to. We should choose where our money goes. Because of what George W. Bush did, your great-great-great-grandchildren will still be paying for that $700 billion bill.


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