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JUNEAU - The University of Alaska Southeast is in line for a second National Science Foundation grant to help preserve Alaska Native Languages. The $450,000 grant continues a five-year project that began with a $360,000 grant in 2007. The NSF "Documenting Endangered Languages" initiative includes the recording and documentation of spontaneous Tlingit conversation, bilingual annotation of the recordings and the archiving of hundreds of audio tapes of Tlingit oratory, narratives and celebrations. The project is part of a worldwide effort to revitalize and sustain languages that are falling into disuse.
Grant extends Tlingit language project 032509 NEWS 2 Capital City Weekly JUNEAU - The University of Alaska Southeast is in line for a second National Science Foundation grant to help preserve Alaska Native Languages. The $450,000 grant continues a five-year project that began with a $360,000 grant in 2007. The NSF "Documenting Endangered Languages" initiative includes the recording and documentation of spontaneous Tlingit conversation, bilingual annotation of the recordings and the archiving of hundreds of audio tapes of Tlingit oratory, narratives and celebrations. The project is part of a worldwide effort to revitalize and sustain languages that are falling into disuse.
Wednesday, March 25, 2009

Story last updated at 3/25/2009 - 10:57 am

Grant extends Tlingit language project

JUNEAU - The University of Alaska Southeast is in line for a second National Science Foundation grant to help preserve Alaska Native Languages. The $450,000 grant continues a five-year project that began with a $360,000 grant in 2007. The NSF "Documenting Endangered Languages" initiative includes the recording and documentation of spontaneous Tlingit conversation, bilingual annotation of the recordings and the archiving of hundreds of audio tapes of Tlingit oratory, narratives and celebrations. The project is part of a worldwide effort to revitalize and sustain languages that are falling into disuse.

Alice Taff, UAS research assistant professor of Alaska Native Languages, wrote the grant and initiated the use of software that enables researchers to annotate Tlingit sound waves with English translations. "This is a record of contemporary Tlingits talking to each other in real conversation," said Taff.

Part of the grant also will go toward the cataloging of UAS faculty and Tlingit history authors Nora and Richard Dauenhauer's collection of 400 Tlingit tapes recorded over 40 years.

As a spin-off from these NSF-funded projects and with the help of another grant from Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research, UAS student Amanda Bremner of Yakutat videotaped Tlingit elders describing the effects of climate change on subsistence.

"This project has laid the groundwork for me to truly understand the Tlingit language," Bremner said. "I have noticed my ear is better tuned for hearing specific sounds and words. I have improved drastically in my Tlingit transcriptions. It has also given me vital linguistic experience by allowing me to learn first hand how to break down sentences while translating into English."


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