Outdoors
JUNEAU - The Whale Project will hold a benefit at 7 p.m. Thursday in the University of Alaska Southeast Egan Lecture Hall. There is no charge, but donations will go to the Whale Project sculpture and fountain by R.T. "Skip" Wallen for Juneau's waterfront.
Pioneer whale researcher to speak at UAS 022509 OUTDOORS 2 Capital City Weekly JUNEAU - The Whale Project will hold a benefit at 7 p.m. Thursday in the University of Alaska Southeast Egan Lecture Hall. There is no charge, but donations will go to the Whale Project sculpture and fountain by R.T. "Skip" Wallen for Juneau's waterfront.

Libby Sterling Photo

Bubble net feeding was first defined by Ginny Jurasz Palmer and Charles Jurasz, who also pioneered the flake identification system widely used by humpback researchers today. Jurasz Palmer will be the featured speaker at the Whale Project benefit Feb. 26 at UAS.

Wednesday, February 25, 2009

Story last updated at 2/25/2009 - 11:35 am

Pioneer whale researcher to speak at UAS

JUNEAU - The Whale Project will hold a benefit at 7 p.m. Thursday in the University of Alaska Southeast Egan Lecture Hall. There is no charge, but donations will go to the Whale Project sculpture and fountain by R.T. "Skip" Wallen for Juneau's waterfront.

Ginny Jurasz Palmer, a pioneer whale observer, will be the featured speaker, followed by a showing of the film "Cry of the Bubble Warriors," by the Alaska Whale Foundation.

Palmer is a retired research associate and management analyst who moved to Alaska 1966. She and her first husband, Charles Jurasz, started doing research with humpback whales in Southeast Alaska in 1968 on their boat the R/V Gingur. Their research was continuous from 1968 to 1981.

During this early research they defined and described several recognizable behaviors, including the now well-known bubble net, and established numbers for the whale populations in Southeast Alaska.They were also pioneers in developing and identifying individual whales by using pigment patterns on the underside of the humpback's flukes.

All of the Jurasz's identification slides were donated to National Marine Fisheries Service to assist in identity, location and longevity data for the Pacific humpback whales. To view the online data regarding identification of humpback whales, visit www.afsc.noaa.gov/ABL/Humpback/JuneauCatalog.htm.

For more information about the Whale Project or to donate online, visit the Juneau Arts & Humanities Web site at www.jahc.org/events.php and scroll to the bottom.


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