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The winners of the Juneau Arts & Humanities Council’s 2017 Wearable Art Extravaganza, themed “Renaissance!” are pieces by artists Lauralye Miko, Michelle Morris, and Angela Ecklund.
Juneau’s 2017 Wearable Art contest 021517 AE 1 Capital City Weekly The winners of the Juneau Arts & Humanities Council’s 2017 Wearable Art Extravaganza, themed “Renaissance!” are pieces by artists Lauralye Miko, Michelle Morris, and Angela Ecklund.

Amy George models artist Lauralye Miko's "Church of the Wild" made of pex plastic piping, plastic sheeting, over 10,000 eyelets, paint, emroidery thread and LED lights at the Wearable Art Show presented by the Juneau Arts & Humanities Council at Centennial Hall on Saturday, Feb. 11, 2017. Church of the Wild won Juror’s Best of Show. (Michael Penn | Capital City Weekly)


Michael Penn

Artist and model Michelle Morris walks the runway in her dress titled "A Lid-dle Un-can-ny" made of recycled tin can lids, canning jar lids, plastic lids, foam lid liners, seine mesh, rivet, paint and PVC trim at the Wearable Art Show presented by the Juneau Arts & Humanities Council at Centennial Hall on Saturday, Feb. 11, 2017. Morris won the Juror’s 2nd Place and the People’s Choice Awards.


Michael Penn

Artist and model Angela Ecklund works the runway in her "Battling Potted Land" entry made of melted plastic flower pots, plant trays, guitar and violin strings, knitted grocery bags, glitter, spray paint and nail polish at the Wearable Art Show presented by the Juneau Arts & Humanities Council at Centennial Hall on Saturday, Feb. 11, 2017. Ecklund won the Juror’s 3rd Place award.


Michael Penn

Quinne Everett models artist Anne Szeliski's "Ladies Let's Get in Formation" made from felt, dowels, gel and string lights at the Wearable Art Show presented by the Juneau Arts & Humanities Council at Centennial Hall on Saturday, Feb. 11, 2017.


Michael Penn

Rogelio Cardo reacts to an audience member as he models artist Beth Bolander's "Tribute" made of recycled sterile drapes and fabric at the Wearable Art Show presented by the Juneau Arts & Humanities Council at Centennial Hall on Saturday, Feb. 11, 2017.


Michael Penn

Dani Gross models "Post-Apocalyptic Rebirth" by artists Beth Bolander and Gary Diekmann and made of metal, keys, gas mask and recyceld copper fuel line at the Wearable Art Show presented by the Juneau Arts & Humanities Council at Centennial Hall on Saturday, Feb. 11, 2017.

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Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Story last updated at 2/15/2017 - 1:04 pm

Juneau’s 2017 Wearable Art contest

The winners of the Juneau Arts & Humanities Council’s 2017 Wearable Art Extravaganza, themed “Renaissance!” are pieces by artists Lauralye Miko, Michelle Morris, and Angela Ecklund.

Juror’s Best of Show winner was “Church of the Wild” by artist Lauralye Miko, modeled by Amy George. The dress was made of Pex plastic piping, Visqueen plastic sheeting, more than 10,000 eyelets, paint, embroidery thread, and LED lights. “Inspired by stained glass cathedral windows, and our connection to nature, Miko hand-­‐painted plastic sheeting and construction material, transforming it into a piece that pays homage to the powerful magic of the outdoors,” says a JAHC press release.

The Juror’s 2nd Place and People’s Choice Award went to “A Lid-­‐dle Un-­‐can-­‐ny”, by artist and model Michelle Morris.

It was made of metal lids from tin cans or canning jars, plastic lids from jars, and foam lid liners. Morris wrote “Whether influencing a king to break religious ties with Rome, becoming an independent political figure, or an inspirational artist, women of the Renaissance broke the mold of the subservient woman with their voices and actions. Corsets and gowns acted as their armor and their voices were weapons. They had to be brave to speak out, even though men thought they were crazy. This piece is constructed from over a thousand recycled plastic jar lids painted and cut with the foam liners used to create the “lace” trim. Hundreds of tin can lids and used canning jar lids were folded, cut, drilled, and riveted to create the patterns on the bodice, sleeves, and accessories.”

Juror’s 3rd Place award went to “Battling Potted Land” by artist and model Angela Ecklund. Made of 100+ melted plastic flower pots, plant trays, guitar and violin strings, and knitted grocery bags. Ecklund used four bags of plastic flower pots and trays she’d almost thrown away in the spring of 2016 to create it. She wrote “perhaps these seemingly useless objects that once held hope for beauty, life, growth and change could be transformed into something as fun to look at as her garden!”

Jurors were David Walker, formerly of Juneau; Cori Giacomazzi of Skagway; and Miah Lager of Juneau. They scored each artist/model team who elected to be part of the juried process over a two-­‐day period. The judges scored participants in four categories: construction, innovation, over-­‐all presentation, and “WOW” factor. People’s Choice was chosen from popular votes from both the Saturday and Sunday audiences.