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David Reynolds, 24, originally came to Alaska from Washington in 2003 to work in a fish hatchery in Neets Bay. Little did he know of the adventures that awaited him beyond the confines of the bay.
Songwriter finds inspiration 'far from the normal world' 012109 AE 2 CCW Staff Writer David Reynolds, 24, originally came to Alaska from Washington in 2003 to work in a fish hatchery in Neets Bay. Little did he know of the adventures that awaited him beyond the confines of the bay.

Courtesy Of David Reynolds

Ketchikan-based musician David Reynolds' first CD is titled "Partial to Blue" and features 11 tracks written in Southeast Alaska.

Wednesday, January 21, 2009

Story last updated at 1/21/2009 - 11:45 am

Songwriter finds inspiration 'far from the normal world'
Hearing Southeast: David Reynolds

David Reynolds, 24, originally came to Alaska from Washington in 2003 to work in a fish hatchery in Neets Bay. Little did he know of the adventures that awaited him beyond the confines of the bay.

Since being here, he has spent time living in remote areas and working in commercial fishing, which has grown his love for the state.

"It was an adventure being far from the normal world," he said.

He now calls Ketchikan home.

Reynolds is a singer/songwriter of the acoustic folk-rock persuasion. Though he usually plays solo on stage, his full sound emanates through whatever venue he's playing and fills the room with a strong resonance.

His first CD, "Partial to Blue," was recorded in Portland in the summer of 2008. It features 11 original tracks that were all written in Southeast Alaska.

"I was exhausted at the end from the focus it took, but I remember thinking that I was finally doing what I wanted to do," he said.

Reynolds started playing guitar when he was 14. He began writing songs with his brothers, and recalled playing with them in their garage as some of the best times in his life.

He has also jammed with many Alaskan musicians.

"There are some amazing artists here," he said.

Reynolds said he is influenced by many classic rock bands as well as Seattle artists like Soundgarden, Alice in Chains, and the Foo Fighters. He gains his inspiration from not only the sound of the music, but also the lyrics.

"Lyrics ... maybe mean something different to me each time I listen to the song, but somehow the words themselves seem to be magical," he said.

"Partial to Blue" is full of lyrical hints of Southeast Alaska backed by sturdy, percussive guitar riffs in a combination of mellow and upbeat tracks. Reynolds was hesitant to divulge the meaning of the album's title.

"'Partial to Blue' means a few different things to me, but I don't really think I can give that one away," he said. Listeners just have to make their guesses for themselves.

Reynolds has ambitions to play around the state at any place that will have him. In Ketchikan, he has played at The Monthly Grind, Fat Stan's, and other venues, and he is hoping to play at the Alaska Folk Festival in Juneau this year.

He is continuing to write songs and is working on material for a second CD.

"Music is a way to say things that you can't get out in normal conversation, but now people listen to it because it sounds good," he said.

"Partial to Blue" can be sampled and purchased at myspace.com/davidbreynolds

Whether the talent is genetically derived, stimulant-induced, or simply an act of self-medication during winter months, there's no question that Southeast's musicians have soul - but often go unnoticed. If you know of a shredder who should be heard, send an email to libby.sterling@capweek.com


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