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JUNEAU - Local artist Dianne Anderson will celebrate the new year and her birthday with a Second Friday showing of Batik floral scarves. These silk scarves are a new media for Anderson, the featured artist during January at the Juneau Artists Gallery at 175 S. Franklin. There will be an opening reception for the show Jan. 9 from 4 to 8 pm.
Batik on display at Artists Gallery 010709 AE 1 Capital City Weekly JUNEAU - Local artist Dianne Anderson will celebrate the new year and her birthday with a Second Friday showing of Batik floral scarves. These silk scarves are a new media for Anderson, the featured artist during January at the Juneau Artists Gallery at 175 S. Franklin. There will be an opening reception for the show Jan. 9 from 4 to 8 pm.

Courtesy Of Diane Anderson

Diane Anderson's batik scarves can be viewed at the Juneau Artists Gallery

Wednesday, January 07, 2009

Story last updated at 1/7/2009 - 10:52 am

Batik on display at Artists Gallery

JUNEAU - Local artist Dianne Anderson will celebrate the new year and her birthday with a Second Friday showing of Batik floral scarves. These silk scarves are a new media for Anderson, the featured artist during January at the Juneau Artists Gallery at 175 S. Franklin. There will be an opening reception for the show Jan. 9 from 4 to 8 pm.

Batik is an ancient process of applying dye to fabric, which is outlined or contained to a shape by using wax or other resists. Anderson uses a brush to paint the dye onto silk like watercolors. Some of her silk painting subjects include local wildflowers "to welcome in the spring."

"I am especially fond of fireweed and wild roses," Anderson says. "I've also included a 'Shrine Icon' with St. Therese holding roses."

In all of the compositions she includes the Big Dipper as her "Made in Alaska" logo and salt textures which absorb the dye, making random raindrop patterns in the sky.

"How can we not be influenced and look for beauty in our constant companion of rain," she says.

Anderson was able to paint at the Shrine of St. Therese on a rare sunny day this fall. "The light fell across the statue of the saint allowing me to see details I never noticed before. It motivated me to find out more about her. She is also known as Little Flower and is Alaska's female patron saint. My design on silk is a tribute to her".

Anderson has been exhibiting printmaking collage compositions on her own handmade papers for years. She has received awards at Juneau's Artabon Show, Ketchikan's Blueberry Festival, Homer's Shorebird Festival, and Seattle's West Coast Paper Exhibit. Now she has become "re-energized" by experimenting with wax and resists, vibrant colors, and using the subject matter she loves, transforming silk fabric into garments.

"There is something very exciting about guiding the flow of dye on silk," she says "It blends, transforms, and resists like watercolor paintings yet can be set with heat to become a permanent wearable piece of clothing."

Anderson has designed scarves for all occasions even a sister's party celebrating her 10 years of being breast cancer free. Her husband asked permission to view the breast cancer awareness scarf: now nicknamed "the boob scarf". Amused, she made more for display and community awareness as well.

Dianne recently completed the 16x40 foot canvas and wood back drop for the snow scene in the Nutcracker Ballet and had a Gallery Walk opening display of her work in the lobby with the premier. She holds degrees in painting and art education from the University of Washington in Seattle, and celebrated 20 years of teaching at the University of Alaska Southeast in 2008. She has also taught art at various elementary schools, private schools, and summer fine arts camps.

Classes at UAS in Batik and Silkscreen/Serigraphy taught by Anderson are currently enrolling online at www.uas.alaska.edu or in person on campus until Jan. 11. For more information on these classes call 796-6100.


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