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TENAKEE—The Alaska Department of Fish and Game announced at the end of December that in 2017 the sport and personal use shrimp fisheries in Tenakee Inlet will remain closed until further notice.
No shrimping near Tenakee, Juneau 010417 NEWS 1 Capital City Weekly TENAKEE—The Alaska Department of Fish and Game announced at the end of December that in 2017 the sport and personal use shrimp fisheries in Tenakee Inlet will remain closed until further notice.
Wednesday, January 04, 2017

Story last updated at 1/3/2017 - 6:25 pm

No shrimping near Tenakee, Juneau

TENAKEE—The Alaska Department of Fish and Game announced at the end of December that in 2017 the sport and personal use shrimp fisheries in Tenakee Inlet will remain closed until further notice. The Juneau area will also remain closed. The closed areas consist of all marine waters of Tenakee Inlet west of a line extending across the entrance of Tenakee Inlet from South Passage Point to East Point, and, in Juneau, Stephens Passage and Gastineau Channel from Little Island Light to Point Arden.

Data collected during the 2016 annual shrimp survey indicates that Tenakee Inlet shrimp abundance is showing improvements but levels still remain low. The Tenakee Inlet commercial pot shrimp fishery was closed in 2011 based on the lowest catch per unit effort in the department’s shrimp surveys since 2000. The personal use and sport fisheries remained open in 2011; however, because CPUE in the survey declined even further in 2012, the personal use and sport fisheries were closed effective Oct. 1, 2012. Based on poor 2013, 2014, 2015 and slightly improved survey results in 2016, continued conservation measures are necessary to rebuild this resource. The commercial fishery, personal use, and sport fishery will remain closed in 2017.

The intention of these closures is to allow shrimp abundance to rebound from the current low level. The department will continue annual surveys to monitor the Tenakee Inlet and Juneau area shrimp resource. The shrimp fisheries will remain closed until survey data indicates abundance can sustain future harvests.