Outdoors
OUTDOORS Morris News Service-Alaska/Peninsula Clarion Editor's note: this is the sixth story in the Morris Communications series "The case for conserving the Kenai king salmon."

Questions remain about king counts

Alaska Department of Fish and Game sonar technician Brandon Key shows off the latest iteration of software and hardware that runs the sonar program on the Kenai River Nov. 1 in Soldotna. Currently there are two sonar sites on the river counting king salmon, one that is used for management and the other a research site which could eventually become the primary sonar on the river. In the weeks since the late run of Kenai River king salmon ended, Key has spent his time analyzing footage from the research site that researchers did not have time to watch during the fishing season.
Photo By Rashah Mcchesney | Peninsula Clarion
Alaska Department of Fish and Game sonar technician Brandon Key shows off the latest iteration of software and hardware that runs the sonar program on the Kenai River Nov. 1 in Soldotna. Currently there are two sonar sites on the river counting king salmon, one that is used for management and the other a research site which could eventually become the primary sonar on the river. In the weeks since the late run of Kenai River king salmon ended, Key has spent his time analyzing footage from the research site that researchers did not have time to watch during the fishing season.
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