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NEWS For the Capital City Weekly It seems that modern life - at least modern life in big cities - seldom puts us in situations where we feel proud of our neighbors, but a recent project in Tenakee Springs brought out some of the very best about life in these parts. Almost a year ago a couple of our residents became aware that grant money was available through NOAA to help clean up marine debris that had been accumulating for years along our shoreline. As was to be expected when dealing with the Feds, it took nearly a year to fill out the forms, jump through the hoops, and then get other agencies like our own Department of Transportation and the Marine Highway System lined up and on board. It wasn't exactly like herding cats but close.

3.5 tons of debris cleaned up in Tenakee

A portion of the volunteers that helped clean up the beaches: Steve Lewis (from back left), Nick Olmsted, Molly Kemp, Carlene Allred, Becky Olmsted, Art Bloom, Tom Heath. Kevin Allred is in the middle and Mark Meyer is in the front.  This photo was taken at the collection site located east of Tenakee Springs on the north shore of Tenakee Inlet, near the old logging road.
Photos By Cynthia Meyer
A portion of the volunteers that helped clean up the beaches: Steve Lewis (from back left), Nick Olmsted, Molly Kemp, Carlene Allred, Becky Olmsted, Art Bloom, Tom Heath. Kevin Allred is in the middle and Mark Meyer is in the front. This photo was taken at the collection site located east of Tenakee Springs on the north shore of Tenakee Inlet, near the old logging road.
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