Outdoors
OUTDOORS Capital City Weekly When salmon were first put in cans in Alaska's canneries, there were no machines to make cans. All the labor was done by hand by Chinese laborers. It is hard to image the amount of work it took to cut sheet tin, shape the can, close the side seam and put the bottom on with lead solder. Imagine the work to make 13 million cans in 1896 and in 1901, 34 million cans! In the latter years, canners shipped more than a million dollars worth of tin plate to all Alaskan canneries for can making.

Southeast history: Salmon cans for early canneries

These soldering tools for making cans were found many years ago on the beach at the Yes Bay cannery site. Frank Roppel polished the two shiny tools and invented handles so we could display them. One copper tool is untouched to show the weathering and how the tools looked on the beach.
Photo By Pat Roppel
These soldering tools for making cans were found many years ago on the beach at the Yes Bay cannery site. Frank Roppel polished the two shiny tools and invented handles so we could display them. One copper tool is untouched to show the weathering and how the tools looked on the beach.
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