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HEALTH Morris News Service, Alaska Physicians racing to rescue patients exhibiting signs of stroke from long-term disabilities or death now have a new telemedicine weapon in their arsenal to stop the fourth leading cause of death in Alaska.

Alaska's medical centers go online to diagnose strokes

Neurologist Robert Lata (left) logged in on a laptop computer, reads information loaded on to another computer screen by Robin Shabica, stroke center coordinator for Providence Alaska Medical Center, about a patient being observed for signs of a stroke. Shabica is using one of the hospital's new REACH (remote evaluation of acute ischemic) stroke diagnosis and evaluation system carts. The system allows Lata to use access and use a Webcam on his laptop from any location to visually evaluate patients to determine if they are having a stroke, what kind and how to treat it.
Photo Courtesy Of Providence Alaska Medical Center
Neurologist Robert Lata (left) logged in on a laptop computer, reads information loaded on to another computer screen by Robin Shabica, stroke center coordinator for Providence Alaska Medical Center, about a patient being observed for signs of a stroke. Shabica is using one of the hospital's new REACH (remote evaluation of acute ischemic) stroke diagnosis and evaluation system carts. The system allows Lata to use access and use a Webcam on his laptop from any location to visually evaluate patients to determine if they are having a stroke, what kind and how to treat it.
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